Tag Archives: Entrepreneurship

A Source of Inspiration: LumDimSum!

16 Dec

For the past two months or so since we’ve launched our website, Anthony and I have been overwhelmed by the amount of love you have all shown to us.  We’ve gotten emails, Facebook messages, Tweets, handshakes, phone calls, and even toasts to how the website is developing and how everybody can’t wait until our restaurant is open.  First and foremost, thank you for that kindness, and thank you for reading our website!

Now, I really love giving credit where credit is due, and so I must tell where one of the biggest sources of inspiration for the website came from.

When I worked for Alan at Hatsune Restaurant Group in Beijing and Shanghai in the summer of 2008, he had this girl Kristen as his Director of PR.  Talk about somebody who truly knew everybody – she couldn’t walk into a restaurant or club in the city without knowing the people at at least three different tables.  A Cali girl – very cool and collected by her nature – but also very smart, outgoing, and a great communicator.  Alan struck gold with her, and not only have they become dear friends, but they still work together to this day.

Kristen leveraged her connections and her bright smile and branched out to direct the PR campaigns for a few other restaurant/nightlife groups throughout Beijing, and in doing so, started to brand herself in the process.  Kristen now runs a website dedicated to food, drink, restaurants, nightlife, fashion, charity, art, and the wonderful city of Beijing.

And so every time a new post would appear on Facebook, I’d go to her website and read all about what she had to say.  I kept coming back for more because, for me, it was so fun to read about new restaurants and the new happenings in a city that I love.  I realized that food is fun.  Food is worth reading about, when written the right way.  In some of Kristen’s restaurant reviews I can actually taste the dishes as I read them off the screen.  They’re colorful, they’re driven by images, and they spark the imagination.

That’s what we wanted to get out of this website.  We want to chronicle the opening of The Vaulted Door, we want to share sneak peak menu items with you all, we want to involve you in the opening of the restaurant through contests and competitions, and finally we want you to get as excited about this restaurant as we are – because once we open we certainly want to see you there.

So thank you to Kristen for the inspiration to create our own website – and one more thank you to her for writing some awesome material that really brings me back to a city that I love.  If you’re at all interested in Beijing, food, drink, or anything else that I mentioned, be sure to check out Kristen @ http://www.LumDimSum.com – really great stuff!

And finally, I really believe that Alan hit a gold mine with Kristen.  I think any restaurant that wants to be successful has to have a person like her.  Lots of restaurants and restaurant groups have PR and marketing people that sit in offices and do a very good job – but Kristen is different because she is literally on the street level, eating at the restaurants every night, meeting new people, bringing guests in, and showing them the magic of all of Alan’s restaurants.  She has become one of the faces of Hatsune Restaurant Group – one that Alan certainly appreciates and is thankful for.  Anthony and I will be lucky to find somebody with Kristen’s caliber of personality, intelligence, drive, and passion for what she does.

…we’re now accepting resumes.  Anybody think they can do it? 😉

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What Is Entrepreneurship And How Does It Relate To Restaurants?

10 Dec

This past Wednesday night I got the chance to reengage with my entrepreneurial roots at an intimate gathering of about 30 graduates of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where we all came together to both congratulate and hear more of (the man I’m proud to say was) my professor Buck Goldstein’s new book, Engines of Innovation.  That was a run-on sentence, I think.

Now I’m not sure if it was because they were all UNC grads or if it was just a coincidence, but the people around me were all so brilliant, but more importantly, they were passionate about entrepreneurship.  You see, Buck’s new book (which he co-authored with the Chancellor of our university, Holden Thorp) seeks to shift the paradigm that entrepreneurship is a ‘dirty word’ and in fact unite entrepreneurs with academics at our nation’s top research universities with the hope of solving the world’s most difficult problems.  A special thanks to Doug Hamilton and Brian Fenty (two UNC grads, do you see a theme here?) for hosting the wonderful event!

Buck put it so eloquently when he described what entrepreneurship actually is.  The coming together of innovation and execution, Buck said, is what breeds entrepreneurship.  One without the other is useless.  And then Buck told a quick story.  A few weeks earlier at a similar event in North Carolina, Dean Smith (legendary UNC basketball coach, one of the greatest of all time) showed up uninvited and was sitting in the first row as Buck was giving his speech.  When he was explaining his thesis about innovation and execution, he likened it to Smith’s career, where he could have been as innovative as he was, but without executing on a daily basis, nobody would remember his name (and some names like Michael Jordan, James Worth, Sam Perkins, Bob McAdoo, and Vince Carter probably wouldn’t have meant so much as they do to us today).  Coach thanked Buck with the finger point that Michael Jordan made famous, acknowledging whoever gave him the assist (but actually was a Dean Smith trademark).

So we know now what entrepreneurship is.  How then, does it have anything to do with restaurants?

Let’s tackle innovation first.  I remember it clear as day, one of the most important lessons I ever learned about the restaurant industry.  Jenn, Will, and I were sitting as interns at the back table, adjacent to the upstairs bar, at Shanghai’s new Kagen Teppanyaki.  Alan was sitting on the other side of the table, and I remember vividly how the polished hibachi grill was so similar in color to his wristwatch that was clanking against it as he spoke.  “The restaurant industry is war.”  Three years later and I now know exactly what he meant that day.  In an industry that evolves daily, you must constantly innovate to stay ahead of your competitors.  When a potential guest walks down the street, she has hundreds of restaurants to choose from.  Why will she choose yours?  You have to innovate on so many different levels, which is why so many restaurants fail to succeed in the long run.  From a culinary, hospitality, service, decor, management, and advertising standpoint, you can have teams of people working to make your concept innovative, but if they fall behind for even one second, the restaurant next door just surpassed you.

And execution?  That is plain to see – without executing operationally on a day to day (and even minute to minute) basis, your restaurant will go down quickly and in flames.  Kitchen doesn’t produce, the guests leave.  The guests leave, the employees don’t make money.  The employees don’t make money, they leave.  Then the owner is left sitting there trying to eat the rest of the inventory before it goes rotten!  That can happen within a matter of weeks, literally, and that is why execution and operations are imperative for success.

Now, you have a team that is innovative and constantly staying on top of the game.  They’re always aware of what the competition is doing and always one step ahead on every level.  But the restaurant doesn’t execute their findings.  The restaurant goes down.  That is why entrepreneurship is the coming together of the two concepts.  It is only when innovative minds are paired with those who can execute that success will be near.

Finally, I’ll bring it a little closer to home and talk about the relationship between Anthony and myself.  While we both have the ability to be innovators and executors (we’re not talking head chopping here, folks), I would say that Anthony is much more of the doer while I am much more of the thinker.  I have always found it magical that I could name some ingredients and Anthony could put together a top-10 meal that I have ever tasted.  He’s like a bulldog in the kitchen – he puts his head down and produces exquisite products.  On the other hand, I’m more of a big-picture person.  While I believe Anthony sees the details and then builds upon them, I see the innovative finished product and then work my way down to the details.  The first time I saw the building that Anthony and I are targeting for The Vaulted Door, I immediately imagined a Saturday night dinner service taking place there.  From there, I worked my way down and built a plan to get to that point – layout, design, branding, competitive analysis, marketing plan, and eventually the financial that fit with and reflected the given plan.  It all started for me, though, with a vision of the finished product.

Based on what Buck believes to be the definition of entrepreneurship, I think Anthony and I are on the right track – the innovator and the executor coming together to form Long Island’s favorite restaurant.  I like the way that sounds.


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